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Posts for: September, 2015

WhileUsuallyBenignLichenPlanusLesionsShouldStillbeExamined

If you’ve noticed a small sore in your mouth, it’s possible you have a non-contagious disease known as lichen planus. Although usually benign, it’s still a good idea to have it examined and monitored.

The condition is so named because its lesions are similar in appearance to lichen, the algae and fungi organism often found on rocks and trees. It’s believed to be a type of autoimmune disease, in which the body treats some of its own cells as foreign and reacts adversely to them. Certain medications and substances may also cause a lichenoid reaction. Besides the inner cheeks, gums or tongue, lichen planus may also appear on other skin or mucous surfaces on the wrists, legs or fingernails.

When it appears inside the mouth it usually resembles a lacy pattern of white lines or ulceration. Gum tissues may become red and inflamed, with some soreness after brushing or eating. Although there’s no known cure for lichen planus, it rarely causes serious problems — in fact, you may not even be aware you have the condition unless pointed out during a dental exam. It may, in time, fade away.

If the lesions do become bothersome (painful, itchy or overly-sensitive), there are some ways to ease discomfort: brushing with a soft toothbrush (to minimize irritation), flossing, and avoiding acidic or spicy foods and beverages which have been known to cause flare-ups. Managing stress is also helpful, and a topical steroid may be prescribed for more severe outbreaks.

Perhaps the greatest concern with lichen planus, though, is it may resemble more serious conditions, particularly oral cancer. The only way to be certain that it is a benign condition is to perform a biopsy on some of the affected tissue. If you notice a problem, be sure to visit us for a complete examination. And regardless of whether you have the condition or not, regular oral cancer screenings, as well as limits on alcohol consumption and stopping use of tobacco, will also reduce your risk of oral cancer.

Odds are if you have a case of lichen planus it isn’t causing you any problems. If it does cause you discomfort, though, you can take steps to ease your symptoms.

If you would like more information on lichen planus and similar oral conditions, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


3TipsforHelpingYourChildFeelMoreComfortableGoingtotheDentist

There’s really no secret to keeping your child’s teeth healthy — good, daily hygiene habits, regular dental visits and early treatment for emerging problems. It’s a lot easier for those things to happen if your child feels comfortable with dental care and visiting the dentist. Sadly, that’s not always the case: many children develop an unhealthy fear of the dentist because the initial relationship may have been mishandled.

Here, then, are 3 tips that will help you foster a healthy relationship between your child and their dentist.

Visit the dentist before their first birthday. From a health standpoint, dental visits should begin soon after your child’s first teeth emerge (erupt) in the mouth. Visiting the dentist by their first birthday also improves the chances they’ll develop a sufficient level of comfort with the visits, more so than if you waited a year or two longer.

Choose your dentist with your child’s sense of security and comfort in mind. When you’re looking for a dentist to care for your child, think of it as looking for a “new member of the family.” It’s important to find an office environment that’s kid-friendly and staff members that work well with children. Some dentists specialize in pediatric dentistry and many general dentists have additional training in working with children. The key is a dental team that has a good, trust-building rapport with children.

Set an example, both in the home and at the dentist. Children learn quite a bit watching what their caregivers say and how they react in potentially stressful situations. If dental care is important to you personally, it’s more likely to become important to your child. And when you visit the dentist with your child, be sure to project calm and a sense that it’s routine — if you display tenseness or nervousness your child may take that as a sign that visiting the dentist is something to fear.

You want your child to learn that the dentist is their friend who’s there to help them. That lesson should begin early with the right dental team — and by making dental care a priority in your own life.

If you would like more information on dental care for your child, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Taking the Stress out of Dentistry for Kids.”


WeighaPoorSmilesEmotionalandSocialCostwhenConsideringRestorations

We readily understand the physical costs of a decayed tooth or infected gums — pain, discomfort and loss of function. It’s much more difficult to understand the emotional and social costs of a lost smile. Without that understanding we may be tempted to view restorative solutions as a luxury we can’t afford.

But there is a definite cost to a smile that embarrasses or makes you unhappy. It can inhibit your friendships and family relations and cause you to become withdrawn from others. Your career may suffer, especially if your vocation involves networking or similar social outreach where you no longer feel free to be outgoing. Most of all, though, your own feelings about your look can keep you from pursuing the things you love or that matter the most to you.

Viewed in that light, a “smile makeover,” a comprehensive approach to transforming your appearance, is an investment in a better life, not a frivolity. Although the word “cosmetic” can mean “a superficial outer adornment,” in the dental profession the meaning is much deeper. Dentists who specialize in smile design are focused on the overall effect of their work — not only with your mouth but with your whole face.

The process begins with a complete examination of your mouth to identify your particular dental needs. We also want to know about your expectations and desires for a better smile. We use that, along with the realities of your physical condition and other factors, to develop a treatment plan. The plan may be as singular as whitening procedures or porcelain veneers applied to the outside of your teeth — or it may be comprehensive with a variety of procedures that could include other specialties like orthodontics or oral surgery. The overall aim is to develop a plan that’s right for you, and realistically satisfies your expectations.

The end result can be life-changing. Even subtle changes can alter your own image perceptions and free you to be yourself in your personal and professional relationships. In the end the positive impact of your new smile will more than offset the costs for achieving it.

If you would like more information on smile transformation, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Impact of a Smile Makeover.”