My Blog

Posts for: April, 2016

By Gallery Dental
April 22, 2016
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: root canal  
ARootCanalTreatmentcanSaveYourToothandRelievePain

One of the most effective techniques for saving decayed or injured teeth is the root canal treatment. Yet when many people hear they need it, they become nervous at the prospect.

Much of this stems from a common misunderstanding that undergoing a root canal is painful. It’s not — today’s anesthetics are quite effective in numbing pain during a procedure, and mild pain relievers like ibuprofen are usually sufficient to manage any discomfort afterwards.

In fact, a root canal treatment relieves pain caused by decay within a tooth. As decay progresses, it can enter the interior known as the pulp, which contains bundles of nerves and blood vessels. It attacks these nerves causing pain and infection. If the infection progresses through passageways known as root canals that are in the roots of the tooth, the pain can intensify. More important, the tooth is in danger of loss as the root and connective tissues that hold the tooth in place are injured from the spreading infection.

During a root canal treatment, we access the pulp by drilling a small access hole, usually in the biting surface or in the rear of a front tooth. Once we enter the pulp chamber we remove all the contaminated tissue. Once thoroughly cleansed, we fill the empty chamber and canals with a special filling (usually gutta percha) to prevent future infection. The access hole is then sealed and at a subsequent visit we strongly recommend placing a permanent crown to provide further protection from damage to the tooth.

Root canal treatments are quite common. All general dentists have been trained in endodontic treatment and can perform most types of procedures. More difficult cases (like a complex root canal network that may be hard to access) may require the services of an endodontist, a specialist in root canals. Endodontists use advanced techniques and specialized microscopic equipment to treat complicated situations.

It’s actually good news if we recommend you undergo a root canal treatment — it means your tooth has a good chance of survival once it’s disinfected and the decay is removed. But don’t delay: the sooner we can treat your tooth, the better your chances of a healthy outcome.

If you would like more information on root canal treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Common Concerns about Root Canal Treatment.”


By Gallery Dental
April 14, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay  
KeepAlerttoTheseSignsofImpendingToothDecay

Although preventable, the occurrences of tooth decay are all too common. Yet decay doesn’t appear out of the blue: certain mouth conditions set the disease in motion.

Here are a few signs of such conditions to watch for — they could be telling you you’re at higher risk for tooth decay.

Visible plaque. Plaque is a thin film of bacteria and food accumulating on tooth surfaces and a prime haven for causing periodontal disease. If you actually see it — a crusty, yellowish film — that means there’s a large, unhealthy amount of it. It’s essential to remove it daily through diligent brushing and flossing and more thorough office cleanings at least twice a year.

Poor saliva flow. One of this bodily fluid’s functions is to neutralize mouth acid, usually thirty minutes to an hour after we eat. If saliva flow is inadequate, though, acid levels may remain high and endanger the enamel. “Dry mouth” can occur from a number of causes, including some medications and chemotherapy treatments. It’s important to alleviate the cause if possible by changing medications or stimulating saliva flow through other means.

Tooth shape and appliances. Largely determined by heredity, your teeth contain unique, tiny grooves known as pits and fissures that could harbor plaque. Certain appliances like retainers, braces or night guards can inhibit saliva flow and cause your teeth to retain more plaque. It’s important then to adjust your hygiene efforts to offset these anatomical or treatment factors.

Acid-producing conditions. Diseases like gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) or eating disorders can introduce stomach acid into the mouth that is highly erosive to tooth enamel. It’s imperative for you or a family member to control these conditions through medication, dietary changes, or — in the case of eating disorders — behavioral therapy.

Eating habits. Sugar and other carbohydrates are a ready food source for bacteria. Likewise, acidic foods and beverages (like coffee, tea, and sports or energy drinks) can cause high acid levels for too long. Cut back on eating and drinking these foods and beverages, especially as snacks, to reduce acid levels that could lead to decay.

If you would like more information on strategies to prevent tooth decay, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Decay: How to Assess Your Risk.”


NewAntiviralDrugscanHelpyouBreaktheColdSoreOutbreakCycle

While it’s common for most of us to get an occasional cold sore, you may suffer from regular breakouts. If so, you know firsthand how uncomfortable and embarrassing they can be and seeming to erupt at the most inopportune moments.

What you’re experiencing is the result of a virus — the Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) Type I to be exact. Don’t let the name disturb you — although similar it’s different from the sexually transmitted virus known as HSV Type II. As with any virus the body responds by making and distributing antibodies to stop its attack. That’s typically the end of it but for some people the virus appears to be able to hide in the nerve roots of the mouth and elude the effects of the antibodies.

The sores associated with the virus tend to break out when a person is under stress, experiences trauma to the lip or even from sun exposure. The breakout begins with a slight itching or burning around the mouth that typically advances to more severe itching, swelling, redness and blistering. Eventually the sores will scab over and heal as the outbreak winds down. The period from breakout to final healing (during which you’ll also be contagious to others) usually lasts seven to ten days.

Although normally not a danger to health, cold sore outbreaks can be painful and irritating. In the past, most patients simply had to let the outbreak run its course with topical ointments to ease discomfort. In the last two decades, however, new anti-viral medication has proven effective in preventing the outbreaks in the first place or at least lessening their duration.

If you have regular bouts of cold sores prescription drugs like acyclovir or valcyclovir taken orally can help suppress the occurrences altogether, and have few side effects. Topical agents can also be used as a supplement to the drugs to help ease itching and other pain symptoms.

It’s important, though, that you undergo a complete oral examination to rule out more serious conditions associated with mouth sores. If we find that your problem is recurring cold sores, these new treatments could help you escape the cycle of discomfort.

If you would like more information on the treatment of chronic cold sore outbreaks, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cold Sores.”