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Posts for tag: periodontal surgery

PromptTreatmentforGumDiseaseCouldUltimatelySaveYourTeeth

Your smile isn’t the same without healthy gums—neither are your teeth, for that matter. So, maintaining your gums by protecting them from periodontal (gum) disease is a top priority.

Gum disease is caused by bacterial plaque, a thin biofilm that collects on teeth and is not removed due to poor oral hygiene practices. Infected gums become chronically inflamed and begin to weaken, ultimately losing their firm attachment to the teeth. This can result in increasing voids called periodontal pockets that fill with infection. The gums can also shrink back (recede), exposing the tooth roots to further infection.

Although gum disease treatment techniques vary, the overall goal is the same: remove the bacterial plaque fueling the infection. This most often involves a procedure called scaling with special hand instruments to manually remove plaque and calculus (tartar). If the infection has spread below the gum line we may need to use a procedure called root planing in which we scrape or “plane” plaque and calculus from the root surfaces.

As we remove plaque, the gums become less inflamed. As the inflammation subsides we often discover more plaque and calculus, requiring more treatment sessions. Hopefully, our efforts bring the disease under control and restorative healing to the gums.

But while gum tissue can regenerate on its own, it may need some assistance if the recession was severe. This assistance can be provided through surgical procedures that graft donor tissues to the recession site. There are a number of microsurgical approaches that are all quite intricate to perform, and will usually require a periodontist (a specialist in gum structures) to achieve the most functional and attractive result.

While we have the advanced techniques and equipment to treat and repair gum disease damage, the best approach is to try to prevent the disease from occurring at all. Prevention begins with daily brushing and flossing, and continues with regular dental cleanings and checkups.

And if you do notice potential signs of gum disease like swollen, reddened or bleeding gums, call us promptly for an examination. The sooner we diagnose and begin treatment the less damage this progressive disease can do to your gums—and your smile.

If you would like more information on protecting your gums, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor article “Periodontal Plastic Surgery.”

WhatyoucandotoReduceComplicationsAfterGumSurgery

Today's periodontal (gum) surgical procedures are less painful and have fewer complications than ever before. Nevertheless, the best outcome still depends on how well you care for yourself as you recuperate. Here are some things you can do after surgery to lessen its effect.

In the first twenty-four hours after surgery, your primary objective is to prevent swelling, the major source of post-operative discomfort. You can accomplish this by applying an ice or cold pack to the outside of your face in the area of the surgery. It's best to alternate five minutes on and off with the pack for the outside, and ice chips, cold water or ice cream inside your mouth as often as possible. Your aim is to surround the surgical site with cold as much as you can with the five-minute on and off strategy.

You should eat only foods that are cold and soft (Jell-O™, applesauce, yogurt, ice cream, etc.), to help ease any swelling. The next day switch to hotter foods like soup, mashed potatoes or buttered pasta, as well as hot, salt water rinses as often as convenient. Avoid crumbly foods like chips, cookies or popcorn for a few days to help keep the incision site particle-free.

We typically prescribe a number of medications during recuperation: analgesics (usually of the aspirin or ibuprofen family) for swelling and pain, and antibiotics and antibacterial rinses to inhibit bacterial growth. Be sure to follow directions with each prescribed medication, taking the correct dosage and for the specified duration.

There is a possibility of post-operative bleeding — but don't panic. You should first attempt to locate the bleeding area, clean it, and then apply gentle pressure with moist, sterile gauze for ten to fifteen minutes. If the bleeding doesn't stop, give us a call.

You should keep the wound site as clean as possible to help avoid infection. However, don't brush, floss or rinse during the first twenty-four hours to avoid bleeding, and limit hygiene activities to antibacterial mouthrinses like chlorhexidine near the wound site for several days to weeks. During the first few days to a week after surgery avoid activities like strenuous exercise, drinking alcohol, sucking through a straw, or blowing up a balloon, as these can also increase your risk for bleeding. You should also avoid tobacco products during this time as these can inhibit the healing process. Each surgery is different and you should make sure you follow the specific instructions your surgeon will provide for you.

Taking these precautions will help keep discomfort and complications to a minimum. They will also help you recover quickly so that you can get back to your normal life.

If you would like more information on periodontal surgery and what to expect, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Instructions Following Periodontal Surgery.”