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Posts for tag: crowns

By Gallery Dental
December 23, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants   crowns  
ChoosingaScreworCementtoAttachanImplantCrown

If you've lost a tooth, you have a number of options for replacing it. Perhaps the best choice in terms of lifelikeness and durability is a dental implant.

All implants have the same basic architecture: a titanium metal post imbedded in the jawbone to replace the root; and an abutment, a metal collar that links the post with a lifelike porcelain crown. But implants can vary in how the crown attaches to the abutment and post — either cemented to the abutment or screwed through the abutment to the post.

Either method will permanently secure the crown to the implant. But there are advantages and disadvantages for each.

A screw-retained crown may better facilitate any future repair that might be needed. For a skilled dentist it's a simple matter of removing the screw and then the crown from the abutment. There's less risk of damage to the implant during repairs or crown replacement. Many dentists also prefer screws for crowns placed at the same time they're installing the implant post (a procedure called immediate loading).

The screw access hole, however, could pose a cosmetic problem. Although we can cover it over with tooth-colored filling, it may still be noticeable and unattractive especially for a tooth visible when you smile (in the smile zone). There's also the possibility the porcelain around the access hole could chip.

By contrast, cemented crowns have a smooth, unbroken surface and are aesthetically ideal for smile zone teeth. But the cement could interact poorly with gum and bone tissue in some patients, causing inflammation and possible bone loss.

And unlike screw-retained crowns, cemented crowns are difficult to remove for implant repair. We may have to drill through the crown to access the screw between the abutment and the post, and then repair it cosmetically if we use the same crown. Again, the final result may not be quite as visually appealing.

In the end, it will depend on the implant's location, how your body reacts to the cement or your dentist's preference. In either case, though, you'll have a tooth replacement that's functional, life-like and able to endure for many years to come.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How Crowns Attach to Implants.”

CustomizedTemporaryCrownsHelpEnsureaSatisfyingPermanentSmile

Restoring missing or unattractive teeth can often be a lengthy process. Months may elapse between initial teeth preparation and final placement to allow time for tissue healing and permanent crown manufacturing. During that period you will likely wear temporary (provisional) crowns to protect the teeth while improving function and appearance.

In the past, provisional crowns were fairly uniform. Today, though, there are provisional crowns available that conform exactly to a patient’s individual mouth. These crowns not only enhance function and appearance, they’re an excellent way to “try out” your new smile before the permanent restoration.

Customized provisional crowns are part of a concept known as “smile analysis.” A new smile involves more than restoring affected teeth: we also consider the overall health of your mouth, the shape of your face, and your own desires and expectations. Your final smile design is a joint collaboration between you, our office and the dental laboratory that will fashion the final restoration.

There are a number of techniques for creating customized provisional crowns. Some techniques involve bonding tooth-colored materials like composite resin directly to the teeth. Others use impression models of your teeth to create an outline or shell that’s filled with an acrylic material and then affixed to your teeth. The aim with any of these techniques is to produce a provisional crown that accurately reflects the final crown’s appearance.

With these types of provisional crowns, we can see how the new teeth will look (their color, shading, shapes and proportions) against the gums, and if they appear to be in balance and harmony with the entire face, including your lips, jaws and facial contour. We can also evaluate how well the new teeth function as you chew, speak or smile.

It takes some extra effort to prepare customized provisional crowns rather than the more uniform version. But this effort is well worth it: by helping us anticipate more accurately how your new restorations will appear and function, customized crowns help ensure your new smile is an attractive and satisfying one.

If you would like more information on temporary restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Concepts of Temporary Restorations.”

By Gallery Dental
June 25, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crowns  
CrownscannowbemadeIn-OfficewiththeCADCAMSystem

The traditional way to restore a tooth with an artificial crown takes several weeks and multiple office visits: from tooth preparation and impression molding to crown production by a dental laboratory, followed by adjustments and cementing. Now, there’s an alternative that reduces this process to a fraction of the time, and all from your dentist’s office.

Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) is a digital system that enables dentists to create dental restorations with laboratory-grade materials in minutes rather than weeks. As it continues to innovate, you’ll see more and more dentists investing in the new technology for their patients.

A crown restoration with CAD/CAM begins like any other with decay removal and preparation of the tooth. It diverges, though, from the traditional in how an impression of your teeth and gums is obtained: instead of rubber-like molding materials to create a physical impression, we lightly dust the mouth interior with a reflective powder. Using a scanning wand, the reflective powder allows us to capture multiple, detailed images of your mouth that the CAD/CAM computer transforms into an accurate three-dimensional model.

We use the model to first assess if the tooth has been effectively prepared for a restoration. If so, the design feature of the system will provide us with thousands of tooth forms to choose from to match with your natural teeth. You’ll be able to view the proposed size and shape of the new crown via computer simulation before signing off on the design.

Next is the actual manufacture of the crown that takes place right in the dentist’s office. A pre-formed block of ceramic material is inserted in the milling equipment where, following the pre-determined computer design, the milling heads carve the ceramic block. After milling, we fine-tune the crown surface and apply stains or glazes fired to create a life-like color and texture that matches your natural teeth. We can then adjust the crown in your mouth and permanently affix it to the tooth.

While much of the CAD/CAM system is automated, ultimate success still depends on the dentist’s expertise and artistry. CAD/CAM enhances those skills with greater precision and in much less time than traditional crowns. It’s certainly a growing option for many people to restore the form and function of decayed teeth.

If you would like more information on computer-aided dental restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Creating In-Office Dental Restorations with Computers.”

By Gallery Dental
January 15, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crowns  
ThreeThingstoKnowAboutCrownsBeforeYourRestoration

Today’s crowns, the visible part of a tooth replacement system, can effectively mimic the shape and color of natural teeth. But not all crowns are equal — so it’s best to be well-informed before you undergo a restoration on your natural teeth such as a single crown or bridgework — or if you need a crown on a dental implant that replaces a missing tooth.

To give you a starting point, here are 3 things to keep in mind about crowns as you consider a dental restoration.

Material composition. Most crowns in years past were made of a precious metal, most notably gold. What it lacked in appearance, it made up for in performance and durability. In recent years, dental porcelain has become the popular choice because of its ability to mimic the appearance and translucent color of natural teeth. Today’s porcelains are much stronger and are used more frequently for back teeth than in years past. A common recommendation for back teeth is a hybrid crown using metal and porcelain. Metal is incorporated beneath the porcelain in this type of crown to create a strong foundation and is also used along biting surfaces for strength. Porcelain is used in the more visible areas for esthetics.

The dental technician’s level of artistry. Most dentists sub-contract crown fabrication to dental laboratory technicians who may have varying levels of experience and artistic ability. A highly skilled technician can produce a crown that blends seamlessly with the patient’s remaining natural teeth.

Take a “test drive” of your future smile. Although we as dentists adhere to certain aesthetic principles, beauty is ultimately subjective — “in the eye of the beholder.” The final product must meet your expectations and level of comfort. If available, then, consider wearing temporary “trial smile” crowns as a preview of your new smile while your permanent set is under construction. This allows you to “try out” your future smile ahead of time, so you can make recommendations and sign off on the final set before it’s finished.

Undertaking any dental restoration is an important life step, both for your health and appearance. Being well-informed — especially about the crowns that you and others will see — will help you make wise choices that lead to a satisfying outcome.

If you would like more information on crowns, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Gallery Dental
December 04, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants   crowns  
WhichImplantCrownAttachmentisRightforYou

Dental implants have come a long way since their introduction thirty years ago. Unlike their predecessors, today’s implants come in various shapes and sizes that can meet the precise needs of individual patients. Crown attachment has also developed some variety.

The actual implant is a titanium post surgically imbedded in the jawbone to replace the original tooth root. The restoration crown, the visible part of the implant system that resembles natural tooth, is affixed to the implant post. There are two basic methods to attach the crown: cement it to an abutment that has been installed in the implant; or screw it into the implant with a retaining screw from the underside of the crown. In the latter case, the abutment has been built into the crown.

While either method provides years of effective service, one method may work better than the other depending on the circumstance. Screw-retained crowns require no cement and are more easily removed than cemented crowns if it becomes necessary. On the other hand, the screw access hole can be visible, although the area can be filled with a tooth-colored filling; and although rare, chips near the access hole can occur. Occasionally the screw may become loose, but tightening or replacing the retaining screw is a simple matter because of the access hole.

A cemented crown looks more like a natural tooth and so is more useful in situations where cosmetics are a factor. The cement, however, can cause inflammation and contribute to bone loss in some patients when excess cement gets below the gums. Unlike a screw-retained crown, removal is more difficult and limited.

As a rule, screw-retained crowns are normally used in areas where the screw hole is not conspicuous, such as for posterior (back) teeth. They’re also more desirable than cemented when the implant is permanently crowned at the same time it’s surgically implanted, a process called “immediate loading.”

Which method of crown attachment is best for you? That depends on the implant location and other factors we would explore during a thorough pre-implant exam. Either way, the end result will be a life-like replica of your natural teeth, and a restored, vibrant smile.

If you would like more information on crown attachment to dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How Crowns Attach to Implants.”